Bridge World Extra! Newsletter

SWISS MATCH

This is the first board of a seven-board Swiss match.

East dealer
Neither side vulnerable

NORTH (dummy)
S 2
H K Q 9 4
D A 8 3
C J 10 7 6 5
WEST (you)
S K 7
H 7 5 3
D J 10 6
C A K 9 8 2





SOUTHWESTNORTHEAST
------3 D
3 S4 DDoublePass
4 SPassPassPass

Club ace, five, three, four.
Club king, six, heart eight, queen.

Plan your defense.

Solution below.

NORTH
S 2
H K Q 9 4
D A 8 3
C J 10 7 6 5
WEST
S K 7
H 7 5 3
D J 10 6
C A K 9 8 2
EAST
S 6 4 3
H 8 2
D K Q 9 7 5 4 2
C 3
SOUTH
S A Q J 10 9 8 5
H A J 10 6
D --
C Q 4

It would be an elementary blunder to shift to hearts; you don't want to fall at the first hurdle. Partner probably won't be able to ruff (if East can ruff, declarer started with six spades and five hearts to the ace-jack-ten; he would almost surely have taken the double out to four hearts); even if partner can ruff, there is no hurry--he has lots of trumps, and South can't throw enough hearts away. If you lead a heart and partner started with a doubleton, declarer can win a heart trick in the North hand, throw one heart on the ace of diamonds, then lead high clubs from dummy. If partner lets two high clubs go by, declarer will get rid of all his hearts; if partner ruffs, declarer can overruff, then clear the trumps with ace and another.

The correct way to achieve the heart ruff is to continue with a third club, letting partner discard his remaining heart. Declarer can get rid of three hearts, but not all four, before playing trumps. Partner will need to work out the correct defense of refusing to ruff when the high clubs are played--not too difficult for a strong player. Of course, when you play the third club you must not lead the deuce, since then declarer could get enough pitches for all his hearts.

 

SWISS MATCH

This is the last board of a seven-board Swiss match.

East dealer
Both sides vulnerable

NORTH (dummy)
S A 6
H K J 7 5 4
D A 6 4
C J 8 2




EAST (you)
S K Q 5 4 3
H A Q 3
D 10 5 2
C A 6

SOUTHWESTNORTHEAST
------1 S
PassPassDoublePass
PassRedoublePass1 NT
PassPassDoublePass
Pass2 CPassPass
DoublePassPassRedouble
Pass2 HDoublePass
2 SPassPassPass

This is definitely one of the longer and less traveled routes from one spade to two spades.

Spade seven, ace, three, deuce.
Diamond four, deuce, king, eight.
Diamond three, nine, ace, five.
Diamond six, ten, queen, jack.
Diamond three, heart deuce, spade six, ?

Plan your defense.

Solution below.

NORTH
S A 6
H K J 7 5 4
D A 6 4
C J 8 2
WEST
S 7
H 10 9 8 6 2
D J 9 8
C K 9 5 3
EAST
S K Q 5 4 3
H A Q 3
D 10 5 2
C A 6
SOUTH
S J 10 9 8 2
H --
D K Q 7 3
C Q 10 7 4

The bidding and early play mark declarer with 5=0=4=4, partner with 1=5=3=4. To have a chance to defeat the contract, you must assume that West has the king of clubs (which is likely, since South might have doubled one notrump if he had it). How can the defense wind up with six tricks?

It will not suffice for you to overruff. You can get a club ruff, but then you can force declarer to ruff only once. Or, you could underlead the club ace to get partner in for a force in hearts, but then you will be forced to give dummy a heart trick at the end (or to give up control by cashing the ace of clubs, which will let South make a club trick). Declarer will get the ace of spades, three diamonds, three more spades, and either a heart or a club.

Since you can't stop declarer from getting three more trump tricks, you should try to arrange that he takes them to your side's advantage. To do that, discard the heart three (think of it as a loser) while declarer is ruffing the thirteenth diamond in dummy. When clubs are led, let West win and lead a heart through. This makes your hand high except for declarer's natural trump tricks.








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