Bridge World Extra! Newsletter
Bridge World Extra! Newsletter

CHALLENGE THE CHAMPS

Challenge the Champs is a continuing bidding battle in which leading pairs compete, bidding deals from actual play (taken from old tournament reports or submitted by readers). Awards assigned to final contracts are estimates of the matchpoint expectancy on a 12 top in a strong pairs contest. An award encompasses all unscored lower contracts in the same strain (e.g., the award for three spades also applies to two spades if that is not separately marked).

KIT WOOLSEY and EDDIE MANFIELD
vs.
PAUL HACKETT and TONY FORRESTER

The reigning Champs, Eddie Manfield and Kit Woolsey, use familiar, natural methods, adorned with many modern devices (including Puppet Stayman). Their base is that of the early versions of Bridge World Standard: four-card majors with nonforcing one-notrump responses.

The Challengers are Britishers Paul Hackett and Tony Forrester. Although most British and American preferences differ significantly in many areas, this pair uses much the same methods as the Champs: generally the modern style, but four-card majors and nonforcing one-notrump responses; and, of all things, Puppet Stayman. However, the Challengers' two-bids are offbeat: Two of a major shows a minimium-range opening bid with a six-card suit (sort of a very strong weak two-bid); two clubs is either an Acol two-bid (strong but distributional), or a normal two-notrump opening, or a weak two-bid in diamonds; two diamonds is the big bid, strong and artificial.

East dealer
North-south vulnerable

WEST
S 10 7
H K Q 8 7 2
D A K Q J 6
C 4
EAST
S K J 6
H A J 10 5
D --
C K Q 10 9 6 2
Woolsey
--
1 H
3 S
4 S
5 D
5 NT

Manfield
1 C
3 D
3 NT
5 C
5 H
Pass

Hackett
--
1 H
5 H
Pass
Forrester
1 C
4 D
6 H

For the Champs, Manfield's three diamonds was artificial--some sort of heart raise. Three spades inquired, and three notrump showed a maximum with short diamonds. Four spades was a form of Kickback (similar to Key-Card Blackwood with hearts agreed), and the reply showed 1 or 4 key cards. That was bad news. To steer the contract into the East hand, Woolsey, West, had to ask for the heart queen (even though he had it himself!), which converted his next move into a signoff.

The Challengers had an accident. Four diamonds showed a heart fit and a diamond control. West had good hearts, thus a slam if partner had mostly aces, so he made a try. East interpreted five hearts as relating to the unbid suit, spades.

Awards:
4 NT 10
4 H 10
5 NT (East) 6
5 H (East) 6
5 NT (West) 4
5 H (West) 4
6 H 1

South dealer
East-West vulnerable

WEST
S A Q
H --
D K J 8 3
C A K 9 8 7 6 2
EAST
S K 9 4 3
H A 10 8 7 5
D A 6 2
C 5
Woolsey
1 C
2 D
3 S
Pass
Manfield
1 H
2 NT
3 NT

Hackett
1 C
2 D
3 C
4 C
4 S
Pass
Forrester
1 H
2 S
3 NT
4 D
6 C

This deal is from the 1978 European Junior championship.

The Americans started with a modern forcing reverse by opener. Woolsey, West, with extra controls and playing strength, thought he was too strong for three clubs on round three. Manfield, East, had a tough decision at that point. He had good enough controls to be interested in slam, but the singleton club turned him off.

The British overcame the problem when Forrester, East, showed strength on round two. Hackett, West, chose the natural, descriptive bid of three clubs, then showed his extra values by bidding over partner's choice of games. This strategy was risky, but reasonable. Reassured about clubs, Forrester, East, with good controls, took over from there as soon as West admitted holding the ace of spades.

Awards:
6 C 10
4 NT 7
6 NT 5
5 C 3








реклама