Bridge World Extra! Newsletter
Bridge World Extra! Newsletter

KANTAR FOR THE DEFENSE

by Edwin B. Kantar

You get a letter from Madras, India, so you take a look. The letter contains a defensive problem, so you take two looks. Let's see if you defend as well as they do in India.

IMPs
North dealer
Both sides vulnerable

NORTH (dummy)
S --
H 9 7 6
D A K Q 10 8 7
C A K J 7




EAST (you)
S Q J 8 7 4
H A Q 4
D 3 2
C 6 4 3

SOUTHWESTNORTHEAST
----1 C*Pass
1 S#Pass2 DPass
2 NTPass3 CPass
3 SPass3 NT(All Pass)
*artificial; 16-plus HCP
#8-plus HCP; five or more spades

Opening lead: Heart deuce (fourth highest)

At trick one, you try the heart queen, which holds.

Plan your defense.

Solution below.

NORTH (dummy)
S --
H 9 7 6
D A K Q 10 8 7
C A K J 7
WEST
S 10 5 2
H K 8 5 2
D J 6 5
C Q 5 2
EAST (you)
S Q J 8 7 4
H A Q 4
D 3 2
C 6 4 3
SOUTH
S A K 9 6 3
H J 10 3
D 9 4
C 10 9 8

Declarer must have the spade ace to justify his original response, so the only way this contract can be defeated is if partner has the diamond jack and the club queen, along with his presumed four hearts to the king. Even so, you must be careful. For example, if you continue with the ace and a third heart, partner will be endplayed should declarer have the diamond nine and club ten. (Dummy pitches the club jack on the fourth heart; West will be forced to lead a diamond, and declarer will of necessity play low.) To avoid this possibility, you should lead a low heart at trick two. You win with the heart ace at trick three and exit with a diamond from your side. Declarer will now be locked in dummy and will be forced to concede the last two tricks to partner's club queen and long heart. Notice that you dare not lead a diamond until you have cashed three rounds of hearts. You must not let declarer cash a few diamonds and exit with a heart, thus forcing either you or your partner to lead a black card.

(Thanks to P. S. Natarasaja Sarma, Madras, India for this deal.)








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